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Vitamin Chart

Minerals | Vitamins | Fruits | Vegetables | Nuts & Seeds

A vitamin is an organic compound required as a nutrient in tiny amounts by an organism. A compound is called a vitamin when it cannot be synthesized in sufficient quantities by an organism, and must be obtained from the diet.
Vitamins are organic food substances found only in living things, i.e. plants and animals. They are essential for our bodies to function properly, for growth, energy and for our general well-being. With very few exceptions the human body cannot manufacture or synthesize vitamins. They must be supplied in our diet or in man-made dietary supplements. Some people believe that vitamins can replace food, but that is incorrect. In fact, vitamins cannot be assimilated without also ingesting food. That is why it is best to take them with a meal. Synthetic vitamin supplements can be of varying quality, so it is a good idea to get your supplements from a reliable source.

Note that the listed vitamins in significant quantities. The are listed in descending order by nutrient quantity.

Nutrient -
Daily Amount Needed
Information Fruit Sources Vegetable
Sources
Nut
Sources
A
10,000 IU/day (plant-derived) for adult males.
8,000 for adult females - 12,000 if lactating.
4,000 for children ages 1-3
5,000 for children ages 4-6
7,000 for children ages 7-10
 
Vitamin A helps cell reproduction. It also stimulates immunity and is needed for formation of some hormones. Vitamin A helps vision and promotes bone growth, tooth development, and helps maintain healthy skin, hair, and mucous membranes. It has been shown to be an effective preventive against measles.

Deficiency can cause night blindness, dry skin, poor bone growth, and weak tooth enamel.

Alpha-carotene, beta-carotene and retinol are all versions of Vitamin A.

Most fruits contain vitamin A, but the following fruits have a significant amount:
Tomatoes
Cantaloupes
Watermelon
Peaches
Kiwi
Oranges
Blackberries
Sweet potato
kale
Carrots
Spinach
Avocado
Broccoli
Peas
Asparagus
Squash Summer Green Pepper
Pistachios
Chestnuts
Pumpkin Seeds
Pecans
Pine nuts/Pignolias
Sunflower seeds  
Almonds
Filberts/Hazelnuts

b1

1.2 mg for adult males and 1.1 mg for women - 1.5 mg if lactating.

Children need .6 to .9 mg of B1/thiamine per day.

Vitamin B1/thiamine is important in the production of energy. It helps the body cells convert carbohydrates into energy. It is also essential for the functioning of the heart, muscles, and nervous system. Not getting enough thiamine can leave one fatigued and weak.

Note: Most fruits and vegetables are not a significant source of thiamine.

Watermelon Peas
Avocado
No nuts contain a significant amount of vitamin B1.
b2
1.3 mg for adult males and 1.1 mg for women - 1.5 mg if pregnant/lactating.

Children need .6 to .9 mg of B2/riboflavin per day.

Vitamin B2 or riboflavin is important for body growth, reproduction and red cell production. It also helps in releasing energy from carbohydrates.

Note: Most fruits and vegetables are not a significant source of riboflavin.

Kiwi Avocado No nuts contain a significant amount of vitamin B2.

b3

16 mg for adult males and 14 mg for women - 17-18 mg if pregnant/lactating.

Children need 9 - 16 mg of niacin per day.

Niacin assists in the functioning of the digestive system, skin, and nerves. It is also important for the conversion of food to energy. Peaches
Tomatoes
Kiwi
Bananas  
Cantaloupes
Watermelon
Avocado
Peas
Potatoes
Mushrooms
Squash - winter  
Corn
Artichoke
Asparagus
Squash-summer
Lima Beans
Sweet potato
kale
Broccoli
Carrots
Green Pepper
Nuts:
Peanuts
Pine nuts/Pignolias
Chestnuts
Almonds
b5
5 mg for adults and 6 - 7 mg for women who are pregnant or lactating.

Children need 2 - 4 mg of niacin per day.

Pantothenic acid is essential for the metabolism of food as well as in the formation of hormones and (good) cholesterol. Oranges
Bananas
Avocado
Sweet potato
Potatoes
Corn
Lima Beans
Squash - winter
Artichoke
Mushrooms
Broccoli
Cauliflower
Carrots
No nuts contain a significant amount of vitamin B5.

b6

1.3 to 1.7 mg for adults - 2 mg for women who are pregnant or lactating.

Children need between .6 to 1.3 mg.

B6 plays a role in the creation of antibodies in the immune system. It helps maintain normal nerve function and acts in the formation of red blood cells. It is also required for the chemical reactions of proteins. The higher the protein intake, the more need there is for vitamin B6. Too little B6 in the diet can cause dizziness, nausea, confusion, irritability and convulsions. Bananas  
Watermelon
Avocado
Peas  
Potatoes
Carrots
No nuts contain a significant amount of vitamin B6.

vitamin chart-2

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