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Vitamin Chart(2)

Minerals | Vitamins | Fruits | Vegetables | Nuts & Seeds

Nutrient -
Daily Amount Needed
Information Fruit Sources Vegetable
Sources
Nut
Sources

b9

At least 400 mcgs for most adults - pregnant women 600 mcgs and breastfeeding women should get at least 500 mcgs.

Children need between 150 to 300 mcg per day.

Folate and folic acid are both forms of B9. Folate occurs naturally in fresh foods, whereas folic acid is the synthetic form found in supplements. Your body needs folate to produce red blood cells, as well as components of the nervous system. It helps in the formation and creation of DNA and maintaining normal brain function, and is a critical part of spinal fluid. It has also been proven to reduce the risk for an NTD-affected (neural tube defect) pregnancy by 50 to 70 percent. Folic acid is vital for proper cell growth and development of the embryo. That is why it is important for a woman to have enough folate/folic acid in her body both before and during pregnancy. Kiwi
Blackberries
Tomatoes
Oranges
Strawberry
Bananas  
Cantaloupes
Lima Beans
Asparagus
Avocado
Peas  
Artichoke
Spinach  
Squash - winter
Broccoli
Squash-summer
Corn
Sweet potato
kale
Potatoes
Carrots
Onions
Green Pepper
Nuts/Seeds:
Peanuts
Sunflower seeds
Chestnuts
Walnuts
Pine Nuts/Pignolias
Filberts/Hazelnuts
Pistachios
Almonds
Cashews
Brazil Nuts
Pecans
Macadamias
Pumpkin Seeds

b12

 

2.4 mcg for adults and 2.6 - 2.8 mcg for women who are pregnant or lactating.

Children need .9 - 2.4 mcg per day.

Like the other B vitamins, vitamin B12 is important for metabolism. It helps in the formation of red blood cells and in the maintenance of the central nervous system.

Vitamin B12 is the one vitamin that is available only from fish, poultry, meat or dairy sources in food.

None None No nuts contain a significant amount of vitamin B12.

c

60 mg for adults - 70 mg for women who are pregnant and 95 for those lactating.

Children need between 45 and 50 mg

Vitamin C is one of the most important of all vitamins. It plays a significant role as an antioxidant, thereby protecting body tissue from the damage of oxidation. Antioxidants act to protect your cells against the effects of free radicals, which are potentially damaging by-products of the body’s metabolism. Free radicals can cause cell damage that may contribute to the development of cardiovascular disease and cancer. Vitamin C has also been found by scientists to be an effective antiviral agent. Kiwi
Strawberry
Oranges
Blackberries
Cantaloupes
Watermelon
Tomatoes
Lime
Peaches
Bananas  
Apples
Lemon
Grapes
Artichoke
Asparagus
Avocado
Broccoli
Carrots
Cauliflower
Corn
Cucumber
Green Pepper
kale
LimaBeans
Mushrooms
Onions
Peas  
Potatoes  
Spinach
Squash-Summer 
Squash-winter  
Sweet potato
No nuts contain a significant amount of vitamin C.

d

5 mg for most adults. Between 50 - 70 yrs 10 mg, and after 70 15 mg.

Children need about5 mg/day.

None Mushrooms No nuts contain a significant amount of vitamin D.

E

30 IU for most adults. Children need between 6-11 mg/day. (1 IU is equal to approximately .75 mg)

Note: some researchers and medical experts believe that with all of the positive studies using higher doses of vitamin E, this daily recommended intake is not high enough.

Like vitamin C, vitamin E plays a significant role as an antioxidant, thereby protecting body tissue from the damage of oxidation. It is important in the formation of red blood cells and the use of vitamin K. Many women also use it to help minimize the appearance of wrinkles, and mothers use it to help heal minor wounds without scarring, as it is valued for its ability to soothe and heal broken or stressed skin tissue. Blackberries
Bananas
Apples
Kiwi
None Nuts:
Almonds
Sunflower Seeds
Pine Nuts/Pignolias
Peanuts
Brazil Nuts

k

70-80 micrograms/day for adult males, 60-65 micrograms per day for adult females.

Children need about half the amount, depending on age.

Vitamin K is fat soluble and plays a critical role in blood clotting. It regulates blood calcium levels and activates at least 3 proteins involved in bone health. None Vitamin K is found in significant quantities in dark green leafy vegetables such as Spinach, broccoli, and kale. Pine Nuts/Pignolias
Cashews
Chestnuts
Filberts/Hazelnuts
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