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 Minerals Chart

Minerals | Vitamins | Fruits | Vegetables | Nuts & Seeds

Dietary minerals classified as "macro-mineral" are required in relatively large amounts.
Minerals are elements that originate in the soil and cannot be created by living things, such as plants and animals. Plants, animals and humans need minerals in order to be healthy. Plants absorb minerals from the soil, and animals get their minerals from the plants or other animals they eat. Most of the minerals in the human diet come directly from plants, such as fruits and vegetables, or indirectly from animal sources. Minerals may also be present in your drinking water, but this depends on where you live, and what kind of water you drink (bottled, tap). Minerals from plant sources may also vary from place to place, because the mineral content of the soil varies according to the location in which the plant was grown.

Note that those foods listed below which contain vitamins in significant quantities.

Nutrient -
Estimated Amounts Needed
Benefits/Deficiency Symptoms Fruit Sources Vegetable
Sources
Nut/Seed
Sources
calcium
Adults need 1000 mg/day.

Children need 800 to 1300 mg/day.

Recommended supplement: Calcium

Calcium eases insomnia and helps regulate the passage of nutrients through cell walls. Without calcium, muscles wouldn’t contract correctly, blood wouldn’t clot and nerves wouldn’t carry messages.
Defficiency of calcium lead to automatically takes the calcium needed from bones. If the body continues to tear down more bone than it replaces over a period of years in order to get sufficient calcium, bones will become weak and break easily.Deficiency may result in muscle spasms and cramps in the short term and osteoporosis.

Most fruits contain some calcium:
Orange
Blackberries
Kiwi
Tomatoes
Lime
Strawberry
Lemon
Grapes
Apples
Cantaloupe
Bananas
Peach

Artichoke
Peas

Squash-summer
Broccoli
Kale
Lima Beans

Squash - winter  
Spinach
Carrots
Avocado
Asparagus
Almonds
Brazil Nuts
Pistachios
Peanuts
Walnuts
Chestnuts
Macadamias
Pecans
Sunflower Seeds
Filberts/Hazelnuts
Pumpkin Seeds
Cashews
Pine Nuts/Pignolias  
copper
The estimated safe and adequate intake for copper is 1.5 - 3.0 mg/day. Many survey studies show that Americans consume about 1.0 mg or less of copper per day Copper is involved in the absorption, storage and metabolism of iron and the formation of red blood cells. It also helps supply oxygen to the body. The symptoms of a copper deficiency are similar to iron-deficiency anemia.

Most fruits contain a small amount of copper, but  Kiwi has a significant amount. 
Apples
Bananas
Blackberries
Cantaloupe
Grapes
Kiwi
Lemon 
Lime
Orange
Peach
Strawberry
Tomatoes 

Most vegetables have some copper, but  Lima Beans have a significant amount.
Artichoke
Avocado
Broccoli
Carrots
Cauliflower
Corn
Cucumber
Green Pepper
Kale
Lima Beans
Mushrooms
Onions
Peas
Potatoes
Spinach  
Squash-Summer 
Squash - winter   
Sweet potato

Most nuts contain a trace amount of copper.
iodine
Adults should get 150 mcgs per day.

The children’s recommendation for iodine is 70 to 150 mcg (that is micrograms).

Iodine helps regulate the rate of energy production and body weight and promotes proper growth. It also promotes healthy hair, nails, skin and teeth.

In countries where iodine is deficient in the soil, rates of hypothyroidism, goiter and retarded growth from iodine deficiency are very high.

In developed countries, however, because iodine is added to table salt, iodine deficiencies are rare.

Fruits grown in iodine-rich soils contain iodine.

Vegetables grown in iodine-rich soils contain iodine. Nuts grown in iodine-rich soils contain iodine.
iron
Women and teenage girls need at least 15 mg a day, whereas men can get by on 10.

It is important that children get about 10 to 12 mg of iron per day, preferably from their diet. Breastfeeding is the best insurance against iron deficiency in babies.

Most at risk of iron deficiency are infants, adolescent girls and pregnant women.

Iron deficiency in infants can result in impaired learning ability and behavioral problems. It can also affect the immune system and cause weakness and fatigue.

To aid in the absorption of iron, eat foods rich in vitamin C at the same time you eat the food containing iron. The tannin in non-herbal tea can hinder absorption of iron.

Take iron supplements and your vitamin E at different times of the day, as the iron supplements will tend to neutralize the vitamin E.

Vegetarians need to get twice as much dietary iron as meat eaters.

While most fruits have some iron, probably the best source of iron for children is raisins, which are rich in iron. Other fruits which have a good amount of iron are: Blackberries
Kiwi
Strawberry
Tomatoes 

Bananas
Grapes

Vegetables:
Lima Beans
Peas
Avocado
Kale
Spinach
Broccoli

Squash-summer 
Potatoes
Sweet potato
Squash - winter
Corn
Carrots
Mushrooms
Most nuts contain a small amount of iron.
magnesium
Adults need 310 to 420 mg/ day.

Children need 130 to 240 mg/day.

Magnesium is needed for bone, protein, making new cells, activating B vitamins, relaxing nerves and muscles, clotting blood, and in energy production.

Insulin secretion and function also requires magnesium. Magnesium also assists in the absorption of calcium, vitamin C and potassium.

Deficiency may result in fatigue, nervousness, insomnia, heart problems, high blood pressure, osteoporosis, muscle weakness and cramps.

Fruits:
Kiwi
Bananas

Tomatoes 
Blackberries
Strawberry
Orange

Vegetables:
Avocado
Artichoke
Peas

Squash-summer  Potatoes  
Corn
Spinach
Kale
Broccoli
Squash - winter
Sweet potato
Nuts:
Brazil Nuts
Cashews
Almonds 
Pumpkin Seeds
Pine Nuts/Pignolias  
Peanuts  
Walnuts
Macadamias
Sunflower Seeds  
Pecans
Pistachios
Chestnuts
Filberts/Hazelnuts  

Minerals 2

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